Mike Teri, Market Manager Defense, HUBER+SUHNER

In an era where electronic warfare continues to grow, military groups must be able to access technology superior to their adversaries in order to maintain effective homeland security. Mission critical C5ISR equipment must remain secure and operational so that communication systems remain open so that our military forces can properly protect home interests.

Laurence Russell, News and Social Media Editor, Global Military Communications

SES, a leader in global content connectivity solutions, operates the world’s only multi-orbit constellation of satellites that uniquely combines global coverage and high performance. SES leverages its vast and intelligent, cloud-enabled network to deliver high-quality connectivity solutions anywhere on land, at sea or in the air, as the company services a wide ecosystem of customers, including organisations in the telecommunications industry, cloud service providers, broadcasters and video platform operators, as well as governments. Today, the company is delivering connectivity to defence, security, humanitarian, civilian government organisations worldwide. Nicole Robinson, Senior Vice President of Global Government for SES, outlines the demand on this arena and how she anticipates its evolution.

Laurence Russell, News and Social Media Editor, Global Military Communications

With pressure from international climate partnerships increasing and worldwide national disasters growing ever more serious, the role of assuring national stability increasingly falls upon our armed forces. In early 2019, a seminal report was released from the Pentagon illustrating the dire vulnerability the US military faces from climate change, and the urgent need to adapt. At this critical time, the Department of Defence’s sustainability overhaul has the potential to lead the way for other militaries to follow suit.

Michael J. Van Rassen – President, Military & Government Markets, Rajant Corporation

Wearable technology is due to take the world by storm inthe coming years, with the military in particular, standing, to benefit a great deal. Connecting man to machine is one of the major challenges with next generation wearable technology, and one that Rajant is working on incooperation with the US military.

Amy Saunders, Editor, Global Military Communications

The battlefield has become increasingly mobile and sophisticated over the last 100 years, necessitating increasingly mobile and sophisticated communications solutions. Satellite continues to play a key role, with advanced, mobile terminals enabling reliable, secure and assured communications.

Laurence Russell, News and Social Media Editor, Global Military Communications

Viasat is a provider of high-speed satellite broadband and secure networking systems delivering services to both military and commercial verticals. The company has been working closely with western militaries to modernise infrastructure and to embrace new solutions. Ken Peterman, President of Government Systems at Viasat, discusses new technologies currently in the works.

Laurence Russell, News and Social Media Editor, Global Military Communications

Edgybees is a developer of augmented reality (AR) software designed to overlay video footage with curated information, for use with manned and unmanned devices with video capability to deliver a video feed that provides a wide range of actionable data to an operator. Adam Kaplan, CEO and Co-founder of Edgybees, discusses the nature of the software, its applications, and what role he thinks AR technology will fill in the future.

Dr Amy Saunders talks to Skot Butler, President at Intelsat General

Intelsat General (IGC) is a wholly owned subsidiary of Intelsat, operator of the world’s first Globalized Network. IGC provides secure satellite communications services to the world’s militaries and the US Government. Skot Butler, President at Intelsat General, discusses the company’s latest advances, as well as recent developments in the field of government and military services.

Niall Kelly, CTO at Netwatch

Border security is a vital segment of homeland security for every country in the world. Knowing who and what is coming and going is vital for the well-being of the nation. Niall Kelly, CTO at Netwatch, outlines the latest in border security developments, and reports on how Big Tech is transforming the sector.

Dr Amy Saunders talks to Jeffrey Smith, President at Riptide

Riptide Autonomous Solutions develops and produces autonomous undersea vehicles (AUVs). Its flagship product, the Micro-UUV, is a highlyflexible, open source AUV which provides state-of-the-art capabilities for operators and developers. Jeffrey Smith, President at Riptide, discusses the state of the AUV market, and Riptide’s place within it.

Michele Windsor, Global Marketing Manager at global battery manufacturer Ultralife Corporation

The nature of terrorism is changing and the threat of domestic attacks in the USA and Europe has bolstered defence spending. Michele Windsor, Global Marketing Manager at global battery manufacturer Ultralife Corporation, explains why the increased focus on homeland security should prompt original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to rethink the way they’re powering their devices.

Dr Amy Saunders talks to Emlyn Taylor, Managing Director of Lockheed Martin UK System Solutions

Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company primarily concerned with research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. With technologies becoming increasingly advanced, it’s critical that companies like Lockheed Martin stay one step ahead of the game. Emlyn Taylor, Managing Director of Lockheed Martin UK System Solutions, comments on the roll-out of machine learning software throughout the government and military sectors.

Dr Amy Saunders talks to Robert Heron, Senior Manager, Market Development Governments and Institutions, SES Networks

SES Networks, part of SES, provides managed connectivity services to customers across a variety of markets, including telecommunications, energy, mining, maritime, government. The company utilises its fleet of more than 50 geostationary satellites and the medium Earth orbit (MEO) O3b satellite constellation to deliver services to where they’re needed most. Robert Heron, Senior Manager, Market Development Governments and Institutions, SES Networks, opines on the state of the government and military market segments, and the role its medium Earth orbit (MEO) constellations has to play.

Ken Peterman, President of Government Systems at Viasat

The battlefield is a complex environment in which to operate; communications must be reliable, secure, and smooth, in order for defence forces to operate to their fullest abilities. Demand for these services, particularly in a mobile environment, is high, as are expectations. Ken Peterman, President of Government Systems at Viasat, outlines how satellite can solve the communications challenges of the modern mobile battlefield.

Bob Ferrell, World Wide Technology’s Vice President Federal Strategy

Delivering cohesive solutions to military and defense groups has always been a challenge, in particular with the slow procurement and development process typical of these groups. More recently, the as-a-service model has become increasingly popular across government applications, and with good reason, as outlined by Bob Ferrell, World Wide Technology’s Vice President Federal Strategy.

Dr Amy Saunders

In a world where two thirds of the surface is taken up by water, the ability to monitor the seas is a vital part of defence forces everyday operations. Working in harmony, aerial, land and subsea vehicles must be able to provide complementary capabilities. While providing communications in the air or on land is now fairly wellcovered by satellite services, subsea communications options are still in their infancy. There’s a long way to go, and innovators are pushing forwards with increasingly complex solutions.

Chris Townsend, Vice President Sales and Operations, Federal at Symantec

Cloud-based technologies and the ability to access data on the move has enabled a huge leap forwards in capabilities amongst government and military organizations the world over. However, this use of cloud technology has raised security concerns which desperately need to be addressed, as outlined by Chris Townsend, Vice President Sales and Operations, Federal at Symantec.

Dr Amy Saunders

Secure, reliable communications on the move (COTM) plays a critical role in the government and military sectors the world over. Satellite, of course, plays a major part in keeping people connected, delivering ubiquitous quality of service the world over. When COTM accessibility can mean the difference between mission success and mission failure, companies across the globe are eager to develop and improve service offerings to the best of their abilities.

Nick Pridham, Managing Director of Hamersham Limited,

Military assets, which often last in excess of 20 years, cause significant problems when new technologies are brought in, each utilising different communication network types. Nick Pridham, Managing Director of Hamersham Limited, discusses the efficient automation of data exchange in modern defence systems.

Brian Tottingham, MASS Mission Data Technical Services Manager

Electronic Warfare (EW) is becoming increasingly ubiquitous throughout the world right now, with governments and defence forces increasingly coming to investigate the opportunities made available in recent years. Brian Tottingham, MASS Mission Data Technical
Services Manager, outlines the latest developments in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and machine learning for defence applications.

Emma Cygan, Design and Development Engineer at Pailton Engineering

Connected and autonomous vehicles are hot topics today, as consumers the world over envisage self-driving cars to make their lives easier. However, connected vehicle technology goes much further than self-driving; design, maintenance and safety are all of vital importance. Emma Cygan, Design and Development Engineer at Pailton Engineering, addresses the need for data-driven design in the manufacture of military vehicles.

Amy Saunders talks to Jay Icard, CEO of XTAR

XTAR was the first commercial entity to provide X-band satellite services in the world when it was founded in 2001. Today, the company exclusively serves government and military users, and is currently exploring its expansion options by engaging with government policy makers and military acquisition authorities to ensure its new systems fully address emerging user needs. Jay Icard, CEO of XTAR, opines on how the company will continue to move forwards in an increasingly competitive market.

Amy Saunders talks to Kfir Benjamin, CEO at GetSAT

GetSAT provides small, lightweight satellite communications terminals for airborne, ground and maritime applications across the globe. Serving the commercial, government and military markets, GetSAT has a wide range of terminals to suit any application. Kfir Benjamin, CEO at GetSAT, outlines how GetSAT effectively serves the critical government and military markets.

Dr Amy Saunders

Never before in history have we been as connected and digitally intertwined as we are today. With the touch of a button, or indeed a simple voice command, we can speak with people across the world, transmit and receive data, access the latest news, film, or media. These unprecedented levels of connectivity deliver life-changing benefits to consumers the world over, and on the defence stage, they’re making all the difference to mission-critical communications. With this new digital era, however, protecting ourselves and our data has never been more important; this is particularly true within defence forces.

Dr Amy Saunders

Thanks to a legion of science fiction books, comics, TV shows and films, the clear majority of us are well-versed in simple point-and-shoot laser weapons, with their seemingly endless energy reserves and red, green or blue flashes of light. Not in common use today, laser weapons have been the stuff of science fiction for decades, but all this is about to change as technology brings laser weapons into reality.
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Q&A Michele Windsor, Global Marketing Manager at Ultralife

Ultralife Corporation is a leading global battery manufacturer in the government and defense, safety and security, industrial, robotics, and
energy sectors. Here, Michele Windsor, Global Marketing Manager at Ultralife, reports on the latest in military technology trends, exploring
wearable technology and the battlefield of the future.

Dr Amy Saunders

When it comes to using military equipment effectively, training is everything. The more man-hours that have been spent learning to utilise weapons or communications systems appropriately, the better and more intuitively that equipment will be utilised in the field. Using the latest technology to aid in soldier training has become commonplace the world over, and with good reason; the use of virtual reality and games have frequently been used to train soldiers in a wide range of skills, including parachuting. This technology-based approach has saved countless lives, and, moreover, helped attract new recruits who can relate more to the technology they’re accustomed to using in everyday life.

Q&A Rob Hall, Head of Product Strategy at Chemring Technology Solutions

Chemring Technology Solutions develops electronic warfare, signals intelligence, EOD, counter IED, tactical communications and cyber security technologies. Its leading-edge capabilities are supplied to Defence forces globally, to mitigate current and emerging threats. Rob Hall, Head of Product Strategy at Chemring Technology Solutions, discusses military communications, Electronic Warfare and more.

Chris ‘CT’ Thomas, Federal Solutions Architect, Ruckus Networks (an ARRIS company)

Wireless communications have completely changed the face of the modern battlefield. Military missions have become increasingly dependent upon wireless communications technology due to ease of use and greater flexibility. Chris ‘CT’ Thomas, Federal Solutions Architect, Ruckus Networks (an ARRIS company), outlines how wireless networking provides mission success, without making compromises on security and scalability.

Todd Dudley, Director, International Business Development at XTAR

It is no secret that the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is increasing. Market projections reflect growth in this global market of over 14.5 percent CAGR over the next decade, estimated to be $20.71 billion in 2018 and $52.3 billion by 2025. This growth is being fuelled by rapid advancements in smaller, lighter, and more efficient sensor payloads and equipment, airframes and engines, which together give UAVs greater endurance, longer range and greater autonomy. Greater autonomy naturally implies an ability to operate beyond-line-of-sight (BLOS) from the operator, which implies the use of satellite communications (SATCOM). While the typical consumer answer has traditionally been the use of the common Ku-band radio frequency (RF) spectrum, military and government consumers have X-band, a powerful SATCOM option available exclusively to them. X-band is purposefully reserved for government use only because it offers significant all-weather performance advantages, operational flexibility, and cost savings. Todd Dudley, Director, International Business Development at XTAR explains.

Martin Coleman, Executive Director of the Satellite Interference Reduction Group

Is satellite interference a growing problem within certain military spheres? Martin Coleman, Executive Director of the Satellite Interference Reduction Group, opines.

Amy Saunders met with Patrick Wood, Director of International Business Development, UK Country Executive at Lockheed Martin – Space Systems

Lockheed Martin UK was created in 1999 under Lockheed Martin to combine all of the entity’s UK companies under one banner. Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company primarily concerned with research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. Some 2,000 people are employed at Lockheed Martin UK across 16 sites. Amy Saunders met with Patrick Wood, Director of International Business Development, UK Country Executive at Lockheed Martin – Space Systems, to find out his vision for the company and his assessment of the space sector.

Amy Saunders spoke with Nick Jovanovic, VP Federal of Thales eSecurity Federal (a division of Thales Defense & Security, Inc.)

With more than 65,000 employees in 56 countries, Thales is a global leader in technology solutions for the aerospace, transport, defence and security markets. Its unique capabilities include the design and deployment of equipment, systems and services to meet complex security requirements. Amy Saunders spoke with Nick Jovanovic, VP Federal of Thales eSecurity Federal (a division of Thales Defense & Security, Inc.), to discuss the findings of the 2018 Thales Data Threat Report, Federal Edition.

Dr Amy Saunders

Hosted payloads are an attractive way of gaining access to space at reduced cost, and within a reduced timeframe. The benefits are many, but several government agencies are hesitant in their use due to security concerns. The overall hosted payload market is a growing one however; here, we take a look at notable recent developments.

Bart Adams, Director of Products and Innovation at Luciad

First responders perform a vital role in today’s world, and ensuring they have the right equipment to save lives is of the utmost importance. Here, Bart Adams, Director of Products and Innovation at Luciad (a Hexagon Geospatial Company), opines on improved communications systems  for first responders using smart devices.

Ben Duke of COPTRZ

What's this The use of drones or unmanned aerial vehicles provides a valuable service for many industries and sectors both in the UK and around the world. Jobs that once required the rental of expensive equipment or were dangerous to carry out such as pylon inspection, roof inspection and crop monitoring can now be done with ease using the latest drone technology. But while most drones are used for legitimate tasks such as crop monitoring or building surveys there are a small number of users who may opt to use the technology for delinquent or criminal activities. Ben Duke of COPTRZ explains how to detect and monitor against unauthorised drone use.item about? What makes it interesting? Write a catchy description to grab your audience's attention...

Amy Saunders met with John Ratigan, President of iDirect Government

iDirect Government was formed under VT iDirect in 2007 to provide satellite products exclusively to the US government. Hubs, satellite routers, line cards and network management software are amongst its product offerings, and the company’s portfolio is growing at an impressive pace. Amy Saunders met with John Ratigan, President of iDirect Government, to talk about the government communications market.

Amy Saunders spoke with Simon Hoey, Business Development, Global Government at Intelsat

Intelsat General (IGC) is a wholly owned subsidiary of Intelsat, operator of the world’s first Globalized Network. IGC provides secure satellite communications services to the world’s militaries and the US Government. Amy Saunders spoke with Simon Hoey, Business Development, Global Government at Intelsat to discuss the company’s latest advances, as well as recent developments in the field of government and military services.

Jim Viscardi, Vice President of Global Security for Metrasens

Terrorists and other malefactors have known for centuries that any large gathering of people has inherent vulnerabilities on which they can prey: Crowds make it hard for security to keep track of any single person or spot unusual behaviour, and the number of people  congregated in one space amplifies the impact of any attack. Jim Viscardi, Vice President of Global Security for Metrasens
looks at the solution to this problem.

Jim Chambers, Vice President Engineering at XTAR

Mobility is one of the fastest growing segments of the satellite sector right now, as demand grows, and applications increase. However, delivering connectivity on board military vessels at sea is far from easy. Jim Chambers, Vice President Engineering at XTAR, explains
the challenges and solutions.

Michele Windsor, Global Marketing Manager of military battery manufacturer Ultralife Corporation

Communication plays a fundamental role in every industry. For the military, effective and reliable communication relies on a complex communication network of equipment, personnel and protocols to share information between multiple parties. Michele Windsor, Global Marketing Manager of military battery manufacturer Ultralife Corporation, explores how developments in battery technology can further advance military communications.

Global Military Communications

The battlefield has changed forever since personal role radios (PRRs) were introduced. No longer are communications limited to shouted orders, notes, hand signals or other rudimentary techniques; today, the battlefield is truly digital. Defence force operations have become streamlined, more efficient, and more secure than ever before.

Global Military Communications

Defence forces have become increasingly dependent upon satellite to enhance their operational capabilities in recent decades. From intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, through to communications in the field and location services, satellite has become essential for everyday operations. As technologies have advanced and become more widely-accessible and affordable, intentional satellite interference has evolved into a pressing threat.

Global Military Communications

Satellite is a key enabler for government and military groups the world over, delivering unparalleled capabilities both at home and abroad. From keeping military commanders up to date in the field, enabling heads of government to securely conduct international affairs, and to allowing officials to respond to local emergencies, satellite provides vital voice, imaging, video, data and connectivity services the world over. While in previous years, many governments had stalled or cut their space programme budgets, a turnaround in investment is expected soon, prompting satellite service providers to ramp up their offerings.

Amy Saunders spoke with Robert Garbett, Founder and CEO of Drone Major Group

Drone Major Group, a group of companies focused on the fast-growing drone industry, was established in September 2017 to bring together complementary businesses that provide connectivity for the first time ever to the global drone industry. The Drone Major portal was launched at the same time as the world’s first online portal to facilitate the sales of drones and drone-related equipment and services around the globe. Amy Saunders spoke with Robert Garbett, Founder and CEO of Drone Major Group, to find out more about the fledgling entity’s goals and market expectations.

Amy Saunders spoke with Rowan Gilmore, Managing Director of EM Solutions

EM Solutions was established in 1998 to deliver communications solutions for the defence, maritime, broadcast and telecommunications sectors around the world. The company has historically manufactured a wide variety of microwave subsystem products, including block up converters (BUCs) with microwave solid state power amplifiers (SSPAs), filters, Ka-band and X-band LNBs, frequency synthesisers and linearisers. More recently, it has developed high value systems incorporating these products, in particular its multi-satellite ommunications on the move (COTM) terminals. Amy Saunders spoke with Rowan Gilmore, Managing Director of EM Solutions, about the changing market and key technologies.

Kamal Mokrani, Global VP at InfiNet Wireless

When we think of homeland security, we often focus on the land aspects, and completely overlook the maritime concerns. However, with any countries around the world boasting purely sea borders, it’s vital that security be effective and far-reaching. Here, Kamal Mokrani, Global VP at InfiNet Wireless, discusses the special needs of seaports security in securing the homeland.

Global Military Communications

For the soldier in the battlefield, technology can mean the difference between life and death, but there’s so much of it – communications, navigation, situational awareness, not to mention weaponry – that soldiers can easily be overloaded with equipment. Wearable technology makes a huge impact, therefore, on the amount of technology a solider can bring into the field, improving capabilities significantly. Commercial entities, military forces and educational research institutions are investing heavily in the development of wearable solutions to the benefit of the warfighter.

Amy Saunders met with Steve Mills, Newtec’s new Global VP of Sales, and Koen Willems, Newtec’s Market Director Government, Humanitarian and Defence Satcom

Newtec, a specialist in designing, developing and manufacturing equipment and technologies for satellite communications, is reporting record yearon-year growth of 10 to 20 percent in a sector facing many challenges. The company is currently looking to expand its base in the government and commercial markets alike following a strong year in the mobile backhaul and mobility segments. Amy Saunders met with Steve Mills, Newtec’s new Global VP of Sales, and Koen Willems, Newtec’s Market Director Government, Humanitarian and Defence Satcom, to discuss their vision for the company’s Government & Defence sector, and the latest market trends.

Shahar Abuhazira, CEO of Roboteam

Semi-autonomous unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) are changing the way defence forces the world over operate. With increasing capabilities, UGVs are able to avoid human injury and casualty, taking charge of many dangerous, dull and dirty operations across the world. Shahar Abuhazira, CEO of Roboteam, outlines how this technology is changing the world for the better.

Steve Bennett, Director of SAS’ Global Government Practice

Technology is a wonderful thing. The possibilities seem endless today as to what we can do with it, and that’s just from a consumer perspective. Within the military, technology has made futuristic applications a reality, but legacy systems have now become a significant problem when it comes to interoperability and data extraction. Here, Steve Bennett, Director of SAS’ Global Government Practice and the former Director of the National Biosurveillance Integration Center within the Department of Homeland Security, outlines the challenge.

Brian Donnelly, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Norsat

Satellite interference is hard to avoid, especially when it is prolific throughout the industry. According to a survey conducted by the Satellite Interference Reduction Group (IRG), 93 percent of the satellite industry suffers from some type of satellite interference. Brian Donnelly, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Norsat, outlines the challenges of downlink adjacent satellite interference in ground satellite terminals, and details how the effects can be mitigated.

Paul Darby, Regional Manager, EMEA at Vidder

Network security is key throughout government and military forces the world over, and it’s becoming an increasingly complex feat to achieve. Information is fast being considered every bit as deadly as actual artillery. Here, Paul Darby, Regional Manager, EMEA at Vidder, outlines the ins and outs of keeping critical networks secure, and reports on Operation Convergent Response, where new and effective cybersecurity solutions were proven.

Global Military Communications

Border security has never been a more pressing issue for governments than it is today. Maintaining the security of a nation is paramount. Whether it be drugs, weapons, explosives or unauthorised personnel, it is vital that security teams keep unwelcome elements at bay. As such, most borders have several security systems in place, which need to be both effective and efficient, to ensure safety and reduce congestion. Here, we take a look at how one of the world’s largest federal agencies manages its border security.

Amy Saunders spoke with Quintech’s President, Frank Elling

Quintech Electronics & Communications, Inc. (Quintech) has succeeded for more than thirty years providing world class products and services to domestic and international customers. Quintech products are deployed in over 120 countries. Working within the analog RF discipline of telephony, cable/HFC, wireless, broadcast and satellite systems, Quintech is one of the leading providers of RF signal management products and solutions worldwide. The company designs and manufactures a variety of products including RF matrix switches, redundancy switches, relay switches, splitters, combiners, amplifiers, DC powering products and test automation and control software. Quintech products enable its customers to bridge the gaps which continue to exist between converging broadband transmission, reception and transport technologies. Amy Saunders spoke with Quintech’s President, Frank Elling, to find out about the company’s market presence, capabilities, and expectations for the future.

Amy Saunders spoke with Chris Mason, Rajant VP of Sales for EMEA

Rajant was established in 2001 when founders Robert Schena and Paul Hellhake recognised the shortcomings in cellular and network
communications, particularly within mobile voice and data networks used by first responders. The Rajant team envisioned a new, more reliable communications technology that would allow networks to be fully mobile and operate reliably in the most demanding environments and challenging times. Amy Saunders spoke with Chris Mason, VP of Sales for EMEA, to find out more about the company’s Kinetic Mesh technology and market expectations.

Global Military Communications

Satellite is a key enabler for government and military groups the world over, delivering unparalleled capabilities both at home and abroad. From keeping military commanders up to date in the field, enabling heads of government to securely conduct international affairs, and to allowing officials to respond to local emergencies, satellite provides vital voice, imaging, video, data and connectivity services the world over. While in previous years, many governments had stalled or cut their space programme budgets, a turnaround in investment is expected soon, prompting satellite service providers to ramp up their offerings.

David K. Chan, Vice President of Sales & Marketing for Quintech Electronics

Manufacturers and designers of vehicle-to-vehicle (VTV) communications equipment and networks can face significant ‘lab logistics’ challenges in testing and validating RF signals for mesh network topologies. David K. Chan, Vice President of Sales & Marketing for Quintech Electronics, Inc, discusses test lab challenges and how test engineers have found they can achieve dramatically reduced test schedules and increased accuracy in RF link testing for mesh networks. The key to achieving these results has been the use of new advanced RF matrix switch test and measurement systems.

Tony Bardo, Assistant Vice President of Hughes Government Solutions

High speed Internet connectivity is a service that many of us have come to take for advantage today, enabling us to stream media content, stay in touch with loved ones, shop online, and work effectively from home. However, one of the most surprising aspects of modern day connectivity is that many governments and enterprises aren’t getting anything like the speed of service delivered to consumer homes, making connectivity a major challenge to operations on a day-to-day basis. Here, Tony Bardo, Assistant Vice President of Hughes Government Solutions, outlines the lackluster services often delivered to government and enterprise customers today, and how satellite can provide an effective solution.

Q&A - Victor Wollesen, CEO at Per Vices

Per Vices builds the Crimson SDR platform; a high performance, multi-channel, and phase coherent software defined radio that supports demanding applications in defence, telecommunication, and infrastructure markets. Amy Saunders spoke with Victor Wollesen, CEO at Per Vices, to find out more about the company’s development, market presence, and its outlook for the global military and government communications sector.

Ray Bernard, President and Principle Consultant of security consulting firm RBCS, Inc., and Paul M. Livingston, Non-executive Director at Accokeek Research and Engineering

With the White House officially elevating the United States Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) to a full combatant command, the focus on cybersecurity within the Department of Defense (DOD) has never been higher. However, when it comes to securing military networks, how much of a commercial approach to security is applicable? The basic security design principles ought to be the same, but are there differences between commercial and military networks that affect the approaches to be used? Here, Ray Bernard, President and Principle Consultant of security consulting firm RBCS, Inc., and Paul M. Livingston, Non-executive Director at Accokeek Research and Engineering, Inc., address these questions.

Q&A - Tony Bardo, Assistant Vice President at Hughes Government Solutions

Hughes Government Solutions delivers a multitude of network and communications solutions to federal, state and local government organizations. The company provides connectivity to critical remote locations, helps agencies prepare for and respond to disaster events and emergencies, and offers training management platforms. With verticals in law enforcement, park services, telehealth and education, Hughes Government Solutions plays a vital role in keeping our government connected. Amy Saunders met with Tony Bardo, Assistant Vice President at Hughes Government Solutions, to talk about the changing market sector and new growth opportunities. 

Dr Rowan Gilmore, CEO of EM Solutions

Radio communications have long been used in the battlefield to provide efficient, reliable communications, enabling soldiers and officers to stay in the know. However, in today’s world, security is rapidly becoming a problem, as is bandwidth and usability. Here, Dr Rowan Gilmore, CEO of EM Solutions, outlines how the latest developments in antenna technology could change everything for mobile government users.

Global Military Communications

Despite the fact that laser weapons are a relatively new invention, still under development to become actual viable weapons systems, we’re all readily familiar with the concept thanks to science fiction books and films. A simple point and shoot model, with no re-loading, and a flash of red, green or blue light marks the ends of foes through television. The reality is, of course, far from what is depicted on our screens, but reality is exactly where we’re headed.

Q&A - Chris Bye, President of Getac

Getac has been providing rugged computing solutions for use in extreme environments since 1989. Today, the company offers an extensive rugged computing product line, including laptops, tablets, and handheld computers, serving a wide range of vertical markets such as military and defence, law enforcement, public safety, emergency services, and industrial manufacturing, among others. Amy Saunders spoke with Chris Bye, President of Getac, to find out more about the company’s latest market developments, and how it is positioning itself to meet the needs of the future.

Global Military Communications

Using the latest technology for training purposes has become commonplace the world over; in the military, games and virtual reality have frequently been used to train soldiers in a wide range of skills, including parachuting. This technology-based approach has saved countless lives, and, moreover, helped attract new recruits who can relate more to the technology they’re accustomed to using in everyday life. Live fire training is vital throughout militaries around the globe, and here, too, technology allows soldiers to be able to train in newer and better ways than ever before.

John Monahan, President of Kratos-RT Logic

The days of single-satellite solutions are fading fast, as constellations become the future, both in the commercial sector, as well as the government and military sphere. Similarly, the cloud is reaching dizzying new heights in its use, as private sector and military personnel begin to recognize the wealth of enhanced capabilities it offers. John Monahan, President of Kratos-RT Logic, outlines how military space is changing in line with today’s technological advances.

Global Military Communications

iDirect Government was formed under VT iDirect in 2007 to provide satellite products exclusively to the US Government. Hubs, satellite routers, line cards and network management software are amongst its product offerings, and the company’s portfolio is growing at an impressive pace. Amy Saunders met with John Ratigan, President of iDirect Government, to find out more about the company’s recent developments, its assessment of the market and its outlook for the future.

Carsten Brinkschulte, CEO at Core Network Dynamics

Communications systems in military and government spheres must be secure, reliable, and usable, above all else. However, as consumer communications technology has advanced almost unfathomably over the last decade, military solutions have failed to keep up. Carsten Brinkschulte, CEO at Core Network Dynamics, outlines today’s solutions to what should be a problem of the past.

Global Military Communications

Training is an absolutely vital part of every soldier’s development throughout his career, to ensure that he is equipped with the knowledge and capabilities he needs to stay alive, and to operate to the best of his abilities. In the past, vastly expensive training exercises and mock operations were staged as the only option for realistic scenario training. The landscape is changing however, as new technologies enable much more cost-effective training solutions.

Q&A Rory Welch, VP of Engineering and Service Delivery at Intelsat General

Intelsat General is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Intelsat S.A., the world’s first  global provider of video and broadband  services. Intelsat General operates pursuant to a Department of Defense (DoD) proxy agreement and has maintained a facility security clearance for more than ten years. It provides secure communications services from more than 50 satellites with global coverage using C,  Ku, X and UHF-band to the commercial and government sectors, including NATO governments. Amy Saunders met with Rory Welch, VP of Engineering and Service Delivery at Intelsat General, to discuss current challenges in military and defence communications, and how the latest generation of flat panel antennas will benefit government applications. 

Global Military Communications

Unmanned aerial systems (UASs) deliver unparalleled capabilities to the military during times of war and peace alike. From mapping potential routes and enemy territory, performing in-air maintenance, collecting photographic surveillance, providing training targets for soldiers, and attacking enemies from the safety of a remote location, UASs truly deliver astounding results in the field. The rise in popularity of ‘personal UASs’ for applications like aerial photography and racing has led to significant increases in the field of UAS development, but has also raised certain safety and security questions. Here, we take a look at the latest military UAS projects and examine the rising number of traffic management systems.

Shahar Abuhazira, CEO of Roboteam

Roboteam, Inc is a leading global provider of tactical ground robotic systems, having completed more than 54 government contracts, with platforms deployed in 32 countries. Its team of experienced veterans lead the design, development, production and delivery of high performance tactical ground robots to reliably support its troops in the field. Amy Saunders spoke with Shahar Abuhazira, CEO of Roboteam, Inc, to find out more about the company’s capabilities and view of the market.

Rob Hall, Head of Product Strategy at Chemring Technology Solutions

The mobile battlefield is a dangerous place to be for today’s warfighter, with threats coming from many sources. Never before has situational awareness been so critical. Communications capabilities can make the difference between life and death, but it is vital that such communications are secure, complete and always available. Rob Hall, Head of Product Strategy at Chemring Technology Solutions, outlines the current battlefield situation, and how capabilities can be enhanced with the latest complete communications networks.

Global Military Communications

The battlefield is one area where technology has always been embraced for all the benefits it can deliver. Enabling realtime communications, surveillance and reconnaissance, telemedicine, mapping and analysis is vital to ensure the full picture is available to commanders on the ground. In recent years, rugged computing devices have become a major component of battlefield operations to enhance communications and situational awareness capabilities on the ground. When it comes to individual soldiers, rugged tablets are leading the way in portability and capabilities.

Phil Yanni, Senior Data Links Architect at Rockwell Collins

Effective command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems are essential for every aspect of modern warfare. However, as technology has advanced, such systems have not kept pace with new capabilities. Phil Yanni, Senior Data Links Architect at Rockwell Collins, outlines how cloud based systems can deliver an effective, modern, solution.

Ray Ivie, Group President of Integration and Operation Solutions Group for LGS Innovations

LGS Innovations was established in 2006 to act as Alcatel-Lucent’s sole sales and contracting channel for all classified and unclassified business with the US Federal Government. The company was acquired by Madison Dearborn Partners and CoVant in 2014, after which it continued to act as the exclusive reseller of Alcatel-Lucent products to the US Government. The company delivers a range of next generation solutions that solve the most complex networking and communications challenges facing governments, critical infrastructure operators, and large commercial enterprises. Amy Saunders spoke with Ray Ivie, Group President of Integration and Operation Solutions Group for LGS Innovations, to find out more about the company’s presence in the military and defence sectors, and how defence forces can remain effective in an increasingly challenging environment.

Michael Abad-Santos, SVP Americas at LeoSat Enterprises

Low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites are big news right now, with tens of thousands due for launch in the coming years should every project see fruition. The lower latency is a key selling point for many applications, with security, sensor, Internet of Things (IoT) and defence applications all expected to benefit. Here, Michael Abad-Santos, SVP Americas at LeoSat Enterprises, provides a more detailed examination of the role LEO satellites will play in military and defence operations.

Global Military Communications

Missile guidance systems have come a long way since they first came into use during World War I, and today feature highly complex and sophisticated technology to ensure the likelihood of success. Not only do missiles help keep countries safe with their deployment, their mere presence is a great deterrent for would-be attackers. As anti-missile systems become ever more advanced, defence forces around the world must ensure that their capabilities are up to date to retain the effectiveness of their missile programmes.

GlobalMilitary Communications

Hughes is a world-leading provider of satellite communications systems and services to the global commercial and military markets. Amy Saunders met with Rick Lober, Vice President and General Manager of the Hughes Defense Division, to talk about the evolutions of the digital battlefield and enhancing situational awareness.

Noam Rosenfeld, SVP, Cyber Intelligence Solutions at Verint Systems Ltd

In 2008, the US military woke up to a growing new threat to its computer networks. An infected flash drive was inserted in a military laptop in the Middle East with the aim of delivering classified data to unknown foreign adversaries. Then, Deputy Defense Secretary William Lynn called the incident a “digital beachhead” - an event that prompted new counterattack strategies. It’s now almost 10 years later, and cyber terrorists have developed ever more sophisticated ways to infiltrate networks and steal valuable military secrets. Experts agree that it’s time to move from a cyber security to a cyber defense mindset, as explained by Noam Rosenfeld, SVP, Cyber Intelligence Solutions at Verint Systems Ltd.

Satellite Interference Reduction Group

Over the past few years, the problem of satellite interference has been widely discussed, with most stakeholders well aware of the problem, and in many cases, some of the solutions available to resolve it. However, it remains a challenge for the satellite industry, and we have not quite solved it yet. If we look at the military satellite environment, its inherent and unique challenges make it even more difficult to resolve when it does occur. As with all sectors, the biggest challenge right now for the satellite industry is getting the users on board with the tools and techniques to do their bit towards resolving interference and increasing mitigation methods in to standard products. Martin Coleman, Executive Director of the Satellite Interference Reduction Group, discusses the key challenges and solutions in the fight against interference today

EM Solutions

Ensuring continuous military communications in remote and mobile environments has become a top priority for military and defence forces around the world. While we’ve seen a lot of innovations in this field in recent years, there remains a lot of room for technology advancement, particularly when it comes to ensuring redundancy. Dr. Rowan Gilmore, CEO of EM Solutions, discusses how availability can be increased with new products, and outlines how the company has met the needs of the Australian Border Force and the Australian Navy.

Per Vices

Personal role radios (PRR) have long been utilized by the military to enable highly-effective battlefield communications. With even basic communications capabilities, soldiers in the battlefield have a significantly larger chance of mission success. These capabilities have been significantly improved in recent years with the advent of software defined radios (SDRs), which enable an unprecedented level of connectivity. Stephanie Chiao, Product Marketing Manager at Per Vices, describes the evolution of battlefield radio technology, and the advantages provided by today’s options.

Ultralife

In 2015, the UK Government launched a ten-year Defence Equipment Plan worth almost £160 billion, resulting in the Ministry of Defence (MoD) offering thousands of new contract opportunities to military equipment manufacturers. With all of these opportunities available, it is essential that manufacturers understand how to present their products to the MOD. Here David Reeves, Director of International Business Development of global battery manufacturer Ultralife, explains the military tendering process.

Global Military Communications

Radar is a highly-effective system that has been providing data for military, defence, aviation and meteorological applications, among others, for more than 50 years now. While more refined and more accurate systems have been developed over the years, the fundamental concept remains largely unchanged. Here, we take a look at how radar is being used for defence applications today, and the latest application developments in the field. 

Global Military Communications

Founded in 2001, XTAR was the first commercial entity to provide X-band satellite services in the world. Today, the company exclusively serves government and military users, and is currently exploring its expansion options by engaging with government policy makers and military acquisition authorities to ensure its new systems fully address emerging user needs. Amy Saunders spoke with Philip Harlow, XTAR’s President and COO, to find out more about the company’s operations, latest developments, and outlook for the future.

Paradigm

Secure and effective networks are key to a successful military communications system. The speed, security and coverage of satellite communications are continuously being improved by commercial solution providers to integrate new technologies and to meet government and military requirements. Here, Ulf Sandberg, Managing Director at Paradigm, outlines some typical field scenarios and how they have influenced product development at Paradigm. 

Global Military Communications

In today’s world, we are more connected than ever before in history. We can do so many things online; keep in touch with loved ones, consume the latest film and music media, essential banking, pay bills, shopping, and even work. As such, cybersecurity has become a major part of our lives. Every individual must remain vigilant to protect their identity and financials from those who would use them for themselves. On a national level, cybersecurity is even more important. Governmental organisations depend on a safe and stable cyberspace to keep our countries safe from a whole host of groups who would wish us harm. 

Global Military Communications

Intellian is a global provider of stabilised satellite antenna systems, providing solutions to customers in the defence and intelligence, offshore
energy, commercial maritime and luxury yachting markets. Its range of antenna systems includes VSAT, Global Xpress, Satellite TV and
FleetBroadband solutions. Intellian’s products are exported to more than 45 countries in six continents through more than 450 contracted dealers. Amy Saunders spoke with Edward Joannides, General Manager at Intellian Americas to find out more about the company’s presence in the defence sector and its views on current and future trends.

Global Military Communications

It is vital in today’s world that soldiers be provided with the best possible equipment. However, that means large amounts of communications, navigation, and situational awareness technology, all of which needs to be moved from place to place in the battlefield. Commercial and military research groups are investing heavily in more mobile and wearable technologies as a solution to the increasing amount of equipment needed in the field. While research is still in its infancy, there already exist a number of viable solutions that are in play today within defence forces around the world.

Global Military Communications

Chemring Technology Solutions was established to develop electronic warfare, signals intelligence, EOD, counter IED, tactical communications and cyber security technologies. Its leading-edge technologies are supplied to defence forces around the world, including the UK MOD and NATO allies, to mitigate current and emerging threats. Amy Saunders spoke with Rob Hall, Head of Product Strategy at Chemring Technology Solutions, to find out more about the company’s capabilities, latest developments and market expectations.

Accutronics

In many ways, the Internet of Things (IoT) embodies the spirit of the defence industry, with a unit of devices working harmoniously to achieve one common goal in the most effective and efficient way. It makes sense, then, that the military and security sectors are seeing increased adoption of IoT technologies to transmit and handle intelligence quickly, with new lightweight and portable devices being used. Here Neil Oliver, Technical Marketing Manager of professional battery manufacturer Accutronics, outlines the three steps to ensuring the next generation of military devices are powered effectively.

Global Military Communications

Rockwell Collins was established in 1933 under the name Collins Radio, originally specialising in shortwave radio equipment. Over the years, the company expanded its competencies to include a host of communications solutions and equipment, and today it has become a market leader in its field. Its electronic equipment is installed in almost every airline in the world, while its communications systems transmit almost 70 percent of US and allied military airborne content. Indeed, Rockwell Collins provides a large portfolio of solutions developed with military and government applications in mind. Amy Saunders spoke with Brad Haselhorst, Vice President, Strategy and Business Development, Government Systems at Rockwell Collins to find out more about the company’s capabilities, market presence and outlook for the future.

Global Military Communications

As more and more data is relayed between the command centre and the battlefield over radio frequency, defence forces are increasingly seeking affordable solutions that minimise costs while maximising capabilities. Software defined radios (SDRs) are the perfect solution, providing the flexibility of in-situ programming, while increasing data relays through a single handheld device. The market for SDRs within the military is well-established, and exemplified by the growing number of new contracts, as well as the influx of new devices, each boasting enhanced statistics such as size and weight reductions, and increased power.